It is counter-intuitive that on the day we reported that September saw record-breaking furniture retail sales, we also reveal that some British manufacturers may have to temporarily close their factories.

Furniture stores in Ireland will close from Wednesday and in Wales from Friday in a repeat of harsh lockdown measures seen earlier this year.

Specialist furniture vertical HSL said four years of investment in its manufacturing operations paid dividends as it upped the volume of product leaving its own factory last year.

The founder of Sofa Workshop stands to be one of the biggest indirect beneficiaries from the sale to Halo Group of the upholstery business he created back in the 1980s.

John Lewis reported a half-year loss of nearly £560m after tax and that has brought with it much hand-wringing about its problems.

For the first time since 1953, John Lewis Partnership says it will not pay its employees a bonus. If that proves to be the case, it will not be because it lacks the resources to do so.

Furniture retailers with a few spare pennies to invest have been watching ScS and DFS closely since lockdown.

The Sofa Workshop business and brand clearly has enduring appeal. Since its creation in the mid-1980s, it has had multiple custodians, with the Halo Group and Timothy Oulton soon to become the latest.

The decision to wind down European operations was completed by Casper Sleep in the second quarter of 2020 with the decision, through no fault of its own, appearing to be ill-timed.

Relyon has all the tools it needs to succeed as a private company following its sale out of administration to its former CEO Ian Topping and other private investors.

Wednesday was a significant day for Eve Sleep, the direct-to-consumer mattress company that has, for a long time, attracted much mirth among its peers in the beds industry.

Wind back the clock. It is June 2016, and Britain's future relations with the E.U. are uncertain as Brits head to the polls.

There cannot be many furniture or flooring companies in Britain that have not availed of the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) in some form or other.

Any major new store development offers an opportunity for fresh thinking and for reimagining what is possible from a modern-day furniture store.

The release of official retail sales figures for May uncover the extent to which furniture retailers have missed out during lockdown but are also revelatory for the impact of ecommerce.

Yesterday saw the reopening of non-essential retail in England and in the coming days and weeks all the shops that plan to trade again will likely be doing so. But an opportunity — and millions of pounds of income — will have been lost, and for no good reason.

Creditors are expected to approve the long-planned company voluntary arrangement (CVA) at Celebrity Motion Furniture by the end of the month, giving the rise and recline company an exit from administration.

The entry into the U.K. of RH, the high-end furniture and lifestyle retailer formerly known as Restoration Hardware, is a drum we have been banging for some time, first reporting its plans back in November 2017.

There can be little doubt the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme has, in the near-term, saved thousands of jobs across the U.K. furniture industry after the Government mandated the closure of non-essential retail stores late March.

Furniture retailers have been told they can reopen their stores June 15 provided they have adequate Covid-19 measures in place. By then, hundreds of furniture shops across the country will have already been open for weeks.

When the JDP Furniture Group filed for insolvency at the beginning of April the outlook always looked brightest at one of the group's businesses.

Having opened six stores over the weekend as part of a 'safety trial', Furniture Village CEO Peter Harrison says he hopes all 52 of its nationwide network will be open by the coming Bank Holiday weekend.

ChrisKnightKeenAbleThe role logistics businesses play in ensuring goods are transported around the country and get to where they are needed has never been more important, writes Chris Knight, director at specialist two-person furniture delivery company Keen & Able.

Having reshaped Britain's beds market in short order, the direct-to-consumer rolled-and-folded mattress segment is morphing again, at pace.

Silentnight, the country's biggest bed maker, is proposing the closure of its Sealy U.K. factory in Cumbria. Here is what it means for the future of the brand and business in Britain.

Gordon Brothers, the turnaround investor and buyer of distressed businesses, has acquired the Laura Ashley brand, archive and other intellectual property.

Dunelm, the major home goods retailer, has restarted two-man furniture deliveries this week. It is unlikely to be the last of the major companies to do so before restrictions are eased, but it will be much harder for some than it is for others.

The coronavirus pandemic has posed myriad challenges to the entire U.K. furniture industry but those that bring product in from far-off lands face additional and potentially existential threats.

Tomorrow (Apr. 9) is the last day of lent. This year, many in the furniture industry have given up two things fundamental to their continued existence: selling and delivering furniture.

With furniture stores shut for at least three weeks because of the coronavirus pandemic, taking payments online and the delivery of outstanding orders represent retailers' only opportunity to generate income.

Few U.K. furniture retailers have yet closed their doors in response to the coronavirus pandemic but by now there cannot be a single one in the country that has not contemplated that prospect, enforced or otherwise.

At the end of January I wrote an article about the strength of Britain's independent furniture retail sector, underscoring the cash-rich nature of some of its companies.

DFS says production volumes in China are increasing again after the coronavirus outbreak temporarily brought factories to a halt. But it cautioned it could face disruption elsewhere, including at its own U.K. operation.

U.K. wholesalers, retailers and manufacturers reliant on Chinese components such as inexpensive fabrics have long been braced for delays as a result of the coronavirus outbreak.

Houseology lives on after The Moot Group acquired the brand and other assets of the insolvent Glasgow retailer, which had been placed into administration through Leonard Curtis last month.

Bed giant Hilding Anders yesterday declined to comment on a report Friday that it is in advanced talks to sell its Feather & Black retail business to turnaround investor Rcapital.

There is no doubting the news maker of the week in the U.K. home furnishings sector: Laura Ashley.

The furniture ecommerce operation is unaffected by the department store retailer's insolvency.

The planned closure of IKEA Coventry this summer will, in theory, put a vast sum of money back into the furniture and homewares market for all to fight for.

Trade is challenging and a number of hitherto heavily-lauded ecommerce furniture retail businesses have hit tough times in recent months. Figures from retailers like Ponsford serve to remind why the balance of power remains with established independents.



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